Projets de développement

Projets de développement

Nous luttons contre les causes sous-jacentes de la pauvreté et de l’injustice sociale afin d’apporter des changements durables dans la vie des personnes pauvres et vulnérables.

Nous travaillons avec les communautés les plus pauvres pour apporter des solutions à long terme au problème de la pauvreté. Nous décuplons par ailleurs notre impact en exploitant les leçons tirées de la lutte contre la pauvreté pour induire un changement social à plus grande échelle et mettre un terme aux injustices et aux inégalités qui font le lit de la pauvreté.

 

Nos programmes concernent principalement les domaines suivants

Summary Kalista is 36-years-old. She has five children. The eldest lives with his father, Kalista’s first partner. Her children are: Amza (the eldest, he is 13-years-old), Shekeli (he is 10-years-old), Erica (she is six-years-old), Enelia (she is four-years-old) and Rose (she is 20-months-old). Kalista also lives with her husband, but he spends little time at the house and does not help very often in the fields. Seven-and-a-half months pregnant, Kalista was worried for how she would breastfeed her child as she was so malnourished herself. When she went to an ante-natal clinic a few weeks before, the healthcare workers advised her children were underweight and small, due to a lack of nutritious food. The family have a few small plots of land. Their main plot was taken over by a palm oil plantation, with no notice given. The family lost all the crops they had been growing and had to start over again late in the season. Kalista would like to join the Growing is Learning project. She had been given some seeds, and had planted them. But feared she had planted them so late, they would not grow. Kalista’s story in her own words “I moved into this house recently. I don’t have a full-time job. Sometimes I sell some ‘local brew’ I make here, and sometimes I buy meat wholesale and sell it on. “I normally buy my food. But when the harvest is ready, I will eat what I plant. “We also farm close to the hills, but the plot was confiscated for the plantation. We had maize and beans growing there. “I grow just about anything; maize, beans, rice, potatoes, anything I can get. “We don’t have a market here. If someone has something, they sell to neighbours. The shops are far away, as well as the school. “I do not have enough food. My child are all so small. I have given birth every year. Even now I am pregnant. “If I had enough food, I would eat three times a day. But at the moment, I eat just once or twice. Sometimes I don’t want to eat, as I have such bad morning sickness. “There are days that I don’t get enough to eat, and the little there is, I give to the children. “Because the children do not have enough to eat, they fall sick. I feel pity for the children. I don’t want to tell them we do not have enough food and would rather give them my share. It makes me happy, because my children are eating. “When we were at the hospital, they told me the children were stunted. I went to the clinic for an ante-natal appointment, and they told me about good diet. I am due in one-and-a-half months. “It is definitely going to be a problem for me to breastfeed. I am worried about it. “We had farms confiscated so we bought a small plot here but it is not enough. They did not inform us, they just did it. It is going to be made into a tree plantation. We had already prepared the land and were ready for planting. And then we had to start over. “My husband is a farmer. He has some mental health problems. He doesn't work much on the farm, I work much more. He drinks a lot. He is an alcoholic. “In the morning, I wake up and prepare the children, then I go to my plot to farm. I come back in the afternoon. We also rent some farming land that I tend to. It is hard work.This morning I had to prepare many vegetables. “There are days when I am not strong enough to cope. You just have to be strong and go for it - what else can I do? Though I hope to rest for one-month after the baby is born. “The village office told me about soy - we were invited to get involved and told how good it was. We were given half a container of seeds and I planted them in the areas where we do not have maize growing. “I was taught to put it into lines, but I need to learn more. I want to go to the training next year and set aside land for soy. “We only planted it two or three days ago. We are not used to this crop. We do not know how to grow it. They explained to us, we should use it to improve our nutrition, to use it for porridge so we have a better diet. I am open to trying new projects to feed my children. If I can grow more of it, I can sell it. But at the moment, I don’t have enough of it to sell. “We are late this year. Everyone else’s maize is already out. But next planting season I want to grow more. I might even rent a bigger, better place. Then I can get to buy things like soap, that the family needs. “Normally I eat very little. Just a few handfuls of food. For ugali, we have to buy the flour. So as soon as we buy it, it is gone. Sometimes, when we don’t have enough, we have to starve. On other days we have enough to feed the dogs. “But they are land-gabbing our farms. They are just some people, who come and buy the land. “I have decided to this will be my last child. Life is so tough. I cannot have more children. I have to stop. “I don’t really know how they are growing, and I don’t have a plan to buy food for them. I am worried for when they grow bigger. They are small now and eat little. Soon they will need more food, and there will be school costs too. “Soy will help me. It will help me to improve the nutrition I give to my children. Next year I want to grow more, and I need fertilisers and seeds. This year, I had to grow the soy without fertiliser, so I do not know if ti will survive.”. Interviewed by Kathleen Prior in Magulilwa village, Iringa, Tanzania on 7th February 2017. Scene-setting information: In Tanzania, nearly half of the population lives below the poverty line. Stunting – a sign of chronic malnutrition – affects more than one third of children under five years of age. Despite growing 70% of the food needed to feed their country, women farmers find it incredibly difficult to provide nutritious food for their families. They work 15 hour days in the field and lack the income and resources to provide nutritious meals. Project information and major issues: The Growing is Learning project will support women farmers to improve their crop yields, learn how to improve their family’s nutrition and increase their income from new markets. Farmers will learn new skills to improve their existing crop yields, such as organic fertiliser production and seed multiplication. This project will support women farmers to enter the profitable soy market by training them in production and supporting women to link into the local markets to sell their supply and earn an income. Soy is a highly suitable crop for the region due to its nutritious benefits, resilience and soil enhancing qualities. Household nutrition will also be improved through awareness sessions and cooking demonstrations.